some artsy title

radicalpamplemousse:

DARN YOU, FULLMETAL ALCHEMIST, FOR GIVING ME IMPOSSIBLY HIGH EXPECTATIONS FOR ALL OTHER ANIMES I WANT TO WATCH

as-warm-as-choco:

actuallygodzilla:

every full body shot of Hazel in her adorable outfits 

Bryan Lee O’Malley’s “SCOTT PILGRIM" art style is SO damn beautiful not even words can describe and I haven’t read the comic series yet. #TheLastTwoOutfitsThough

This is actually from his most recent graphic novel, “Seconds”! You can see the protagonist’s spiky, star-shaped hair in the second to last photo (hiding out in the corner). :D 

Blake needs a hug more than anyone in the series right now.
And Sun needs to be the one to give her one *cough**cough* WAIT WHAT

Blake needs a hug more than anyone in the series right now.

And Sun needs to be the one to give her one *cough**cough* WAIT WHAT

boxlunches:

princess-peachie:

lovelylor:

mamamidnight:

bludgers-rondelles:

cast of spongebob dubs classic movies

I aM SnORtinh UNConrTOLABly wiTH LAUghTrt

God damn it.

This is amazing

IT’S ACTUALLY THEM

They should just forget about animating new episodes and do this all the time

In all honesty, when I see certain Doctor Who things tagged with either “moffat era” or “rtd era”, it sounds like we’re talking about Shogun eras in Japan, not a TV series xD

Everyone’s favorite Ice Queen!

Everyone’s favorite Ice Queen!

storyshots:

Drawing from films

Drawing from films is a ridiculously useful exercise. It’s not enough to watch films; it’s not enough to look at someone else’s drawings from films. If you want to be in story, there’s no excuse for not doing this.

The way this works: you draw tons of tiny little panels, tiny enough that you won’t be tempted to fuss about drawing details. You put on a movie - I recommend Raiders, E.T., or Jaws… but honestly if there’s some other movie you love enough to freeze frame the shit out of, do what works for you. It’s good to do this with a movie you already know by heart.

Hit play. Every time there’s a cut, you hit pause, draw the frame, and hit play til it cuts again. If there’s a pan or camera move, draw the first and last frames.

Note on movies: Spielberg is great for this because he’s both evocative and efficient. Michael Bay is good at what he does, but part of what he does is cut so often that you will be sorry you picked his movie to draw from. Haneke is magnificent at what he does, but cuts so little that you will wind up with three drawings of a chair. Peter Jackson… he’s great, but not efficient. If you love a Spielberg movie enough to spend a month with it, do yourself a favor and use Spielberg.

What to look for:

  • Foreground, middle ground, background: where is the character? What is the point of the shot? What is it showing? What’s being used as a framing device? How does that help tie this shot into the geography of the scene? Is the background flat, or a location that lends itself to depth?
  • Composition: How is the frame divided? What takes up most of the space? How are the angles and lines in the shot leading your eye?
  • Reusing setups, economy: Does the film keep coming back to the same shot? The way liveaction works, that means they set up the camera and filmed one long take from that angle. Sometimes this includes a camera move, recomposing one long take into what look like separate shots. If you pay attention, you can catch them.
  • Camera position, angle, height: Is the camera fixed at shoulder height? Eye height? Sitting on the floor? Angled up? Down? Is it shooting straight on towards a wall, or at an angle? Does it favor the floor or the ceiling?
  • Lenses: wide-angle lens or long lens? Basic rule of thumb: If the character is large in frame and you can still see plenty of their surroundings, the lens is wide and the character is very close to camera. If the character’s surroundings seem to dwarf them, the lens is long (zoomed in).
  • Lighting: Notice it, but don’t draw it. What in the scene is lit? How is this directing your eye? How many lights? Do they make sense in the scene, or do they just FEEL right?

This seems like a lot to keep in mind, and honestly, don’t worry about any of that. Draw 100 thumbnails at a time, pat yourself on the back, and you will start to notice these things as you go.


Don’t worry about the drawings, either. You can see from my drawings that these aren’t for show. They’re notes to yourself. They’re strictly for learning. 

Now get out there and do a set! Tweet me at @lawnrocket and I’ll give you extra backpats for actually following through on it. Just be aware - your friends will look at you super weird when you start going off about how that one shot in Raiders was a pickup - it HAD to be - because it doesn’t make sense except for to string these other two shots together…

wannabeanimator:

New images from Disney’s “Feast”

OH MY GOD is this Paperman style?!!!

OH MY GOD it’s in COLOR?!!!

COMPETITION ANNOUNCEMENT

dreamworksstaff:

We are going to be taking fan work submissions as of Friday 22nd August, and posting the top twenty in 2 weeks time. Any fan work based on any DreamWorks material, whether it be films, concept art or other. We want to see what you’ve got!
Entry Open from 22nd August, any submitted prior to then will not be counted.
Entry Closed after 5th September, any submitted later will not be counted either.
Have fun, get creative, and show us what you can do!

OH MAN OH MAN OH MAN!!

Split the ice apart, and break the frozen heart.

A one of a kind piece created for the Toledo Art Walk! :D

Split the ice apart, and break the frozen heart.

A one of a kind piece created for the Toledo Art Walk! :D

In Memoriam: Richard Attenborough

lovepirate77:

In Memoriam: Richard Attenborough

IMG_0961.PNG
How do you sum up a life and career as successful and enduring as Richard Attenborough’s? With over 60 years in the film industry, a knighthood and a peerage, his life seemingly could speak for itself. In addition to his contributions to the movies, he’ll also be remembered for his charity work, particularly in the fight against muscular dystrophy and as an advocate for education. But for us film…

View On WordPress

Another great actor and a great man has passed on. Rest in peace, good sir. :’)

Snapshots of some sketches done for co-workers at my retail job. :)

The baby robot is my fav.

6 things (most) recruiters want artists to know about the hiring process

offcolored:

The following is not an official representation of Floyd County Productions or their practices as a studio, nor any other studios that have previously employed me. Now, having said that…

  1. Reading comprehension is important. So you’ve been informed a studio is accepting portfolios, and you’re ready to put yourself out there. Great!

    Don’t skim the job posting. Read it. Absorb it. Mash your eyeballs right into the screen. Realize that was dumb and painful, then read it again. Lots of job listings ask you to supply the recruiter with specific information. When we open your email and the only thing we find within is a sad, lonely hyperlink… well, you’re not even out of the starting gate and already we’re considering placing our bet on another pony. Enough horse analogies, or should I let it ride? Yea/neigh?

  2. If we can’t find your artwork in the first 15 seconds of opening your URL, then your portfolio isn’t worth it. You could have the most amazing work in the industry, but if a recruiter has to organize a search party to locate it, then you’re running the risk of no one ever viewing it. For example, if your portfolio is the seventh in a row to require a detailed roadmap and thorough hand-holding just to navigate it, then they may close your site and move right along. Why? Because our time is valuable.

    Your site needs to be clean, easy to navigate, and multi-platform compatible. Front and center should be clear links to your gallery, resume, demo reel (if applicable), and contact information. If you use anything that has a tagging system (like tumblr or blogger), then make sure you haven’t clogged up your navigation with other tags that you may not want a recruiter delving into, for whatever reason. Speaking of personal information…

  3. We go a little creeper on you. Congrats, you’ve hooked me with your portfolio. So my next step is to dig up any and all info I can from your many online accounts. Why? Many reasons. Will you fit in with us? Are you talking smack about previous employers or co-workers? Have you been featured in any articles or received accolades? Have you ranted about how tedious and annoying you find our test? The reasons are vast and various.

    Everyone has bad days and crappy experiences, and no one should expect your personal sites to be 100% professional, but many recruiters will still try to get a general feeling for your demeanor. And if your demeanor is that of an intolerable ass that says shitty things about other artists or studios… blacklisted. So just be aware, and make your decisions accordingly.

  4. It’s ok to touch base after an appropriate amount of time, but be reasonable. If the recruiter gave a cut-off date for applications, I recommend waiting about 3 weeks from that time to send them a courtesy email. If the recruiter doesn’t ask for further info from you, then do not share their email with other people and flood their inbox with references. You can be eager, just don’t be annoying.

  5. Don’t snub inquiries. Things happen. Sometimes, good things happen. However, don’t fall off the face of the earth if you were previously showing interest in a studio. Studios (and your rep) will appreciate you so much more if you simply explain that a better offer came along (although maybe you shouldn’t say it was better), rather than leaving them hanging with no correspondence at all.

    On the other hand, sometimes really shitty things happen, and it’s alright to turn a studio’s test down due to personal conflicts. Please just relay to them that you’re unable to complete their test as planned.

  6. Be polite. Be polite be polite be polite be polite. So. You know. Be polite.
lancecharleson:

joeywaggoner:

squigglydigg:

smokingladiesman submitted:

Disney’s tribute to Robin Williams at the end of Aladdin. 

That’s… actually really beautiful.  Well done, Disney.

I actually watched Aladdin on Disney Channel a few days ago and not only did they show this image at the end of the film but they showed the entire movie completely commercial free. That’s how much they appreciated him.
Well done Disney, well done.

Now that’s some grade A respect from Disney right there.

lancecharleson:

joeywaggoner:

squigglydigg:

 submitted:

Disney’s tribute to Robin Williams at the end of Aladdin. 

That’s… actually really beautiful.  Well done, Disney.

I actually watched Aladdin on Disney Channel a few days ago and not only did they show this image at the end of the film but they showed the entire movie completely commercial free. That’s how much they appreciated him.

Well done Disney, well done.

Now that’s some grade A respect from Disney right there.

Finally keeping to my promise and uploading new artwork! And kicking it off with a new ID / icon! <3
How have I gone 23 years in life with the last name “rose” without utilizing rose crowns in any self portraits? I don’t even know man. 

Finally keeping to my promise and uploading new artwork! And kicking it off with a new ID / icon! <3

How have I gone 23 years in life with the last name “rose” without utilizing rose crowns in any self portraits? I don’t even know man.