some artsy title
6 things (most) recruiters want artists to know about the hiring process

offcolored:

The following is not an official representation of Floyd County Productions or their practices as a studio, nor any other studios that have previously employed me. Now, having said that…

  1. Reading comprehension is important. So you’ve been informed a studio is accepting portfolios, and you’re ready to put yourself out there. Great!

    Don’t skim the job posting. Read it. Absorb it. Mash your eyeballs right into the screen. Realize that was dumb and painful, then read it again. Lots of job listings ask you to supply the recruiter with specific information. When we open your email and the only thing we find within is a sad, lonely hyperlink… well, you’re not even out of the starting gate and already we’re considering placing our bet on another pony. Enough horse analogies, or should I let it ride? Yea/neigh?

  2. If we can’t find your artwork in the first 15 seconds of opening your URL, then your portfolio isn’t worth it. You could have the most amazing work in the industry, but if a recruiter has to organize a search party to locate it, then you’re running the risk of no one ever viewing it. For example, if your portfolio is the seventh in a row to require a detailed roadmap and thorough hand-holding just to navigate it, then they may close your site and move right along. Why? Because our time is valuable.

    Your site needs to be clean, easy to navigate, and multi-platform compatible. Front and center should be clear links to your gallery, resume, demo reel (if applicable), and contact information. If you use anything that has a tagging system (like tumblr or blogger), then make sure you haven’t clogged up your navigation with other tags that you may not want a recruiter delving into, for whatever reason. Speaking of personal information…

  3. We go a little creeper on you. Congrats, you’ve hooked me with your portfolio. So my next step is to dig up any and all info I can from your many online accounts. Why? Many reasons. Will you fit in with us? Are you talking smack about previous employers or co-workers? Have you been featured in any articles or received accolades? Have you ranted about how tedious and annoying you find our test? The reasons are vast and various.

    Everyone has bad days and crappy experiences, and no one should expect your personal sites to be 100% professional, but many recruiters will still try to get a general feeling for your demeanor. And if your demeanor is that of an intolerable ass that says shitty things about other artists or studios… blacklisted. So just be aware, and make your decisions accordingly.

  4. It’s ok to touch base after an appropriate amount of time, but be reasonable. If the recruiter gave a cut-off date for applications, I recommend waiting about 3 weeks from that time to send them a courtesy email. If the recruiter doesn’t ask for further info from you, then do not share their email with other people and flood their inbox with references. You can be eager, just don’t be annoying.

  5. Don’t snub inquiries. Things happen. Sometimes, good things happen. However, don’t fall off the face of the earth if you were previously showing interest in a studio. Studios (and your rep) will appreciate you so much more if you simply explain that a better offer came along (although maybe you shouldn’t say it was better), rather than leaving them hanging with no correspondence at all.

    On the other hand, sometimes really shitty things happen, and it’s alright to turn a studio’s test down due to personal conflicts. Please just relay to them that you’re unable to complete their test as planned.

  6. Be polite. Be polite be polite be polite be polite. So. You know. Be polite.
lancecharleson:

joeywaggoner:

squigglydigg:

smokingladiesman submitted:

Disney’s tribute to Robin Williams at the end of Aladdin. 

That’s… actually really beautiful.  Well done, Disney.

I actually watched Aladdin on Disney Channel a few days ago and not only did they show this image at the end of the film but they showed the entire movie completely commercial free. That’s how much they appreciated him.
Well done Disney, well done.

Now that’s some grade A respect from Disney right there.

lancecharleson:

joeywaggoner:

squigglydigg:

 submitted:

Disney’s tribute to Robin Williams at the end of Aladdin. 

That’s… actually really beautiful.  Well done, Disney.

I actually watched Aladdin on Disney Channel a few days ago and not only did they show this image at the end of the film but they showed the entire movie completely commercial free. That’s how much they appreciated him.

Well done Disney, well done.

Now that’s some grade A respect from Disney right there.

Finally keeping to my promise and uploading new artwork! And kicking it off with a new ID / icon! <3
How have I gone 23 years in life with the last name “rose” without utilizing rose crowns in any self portraits? I don’t even know man. 

Finally keeping to my promise and uploading new artwork! And kicking it off with a new ID / icon! <3

How have I gone 23 years in life with the last name “rose” without utilizing rose crowns in any self portraits? I don’t even know man. 

danadelions:

when you feel jealous or bitter over an artist’s achievements, always remember: people only show what they want to show of their art

 you would be surprised how hilariously bad some sketches of even experienced artists can look, and I don’t mean that in an insulting way. Also don’t think of the pics with the ‘man, such a sloppy doodle’ descriptions, I mean the truly horrible scribbles everybody does in their freetime. Even the most experienced artists have sketches that look like they had no orientation of lines in mind, with one arm going over the entire body and the other being half the length, etc, and that’s the COLD HARD AND WONDERFUL TRUTH

 No artist you look at does perfect work all the time, as hard as it is to imagine.
Any artist wants to give off the best impression they can, so frankly the very flawed looking stuff stays on a few papers at home without ever facing the internet or even close friends

 Similarily to how most people won’t go outside in a t-shirt with ten coffee stains and three holes in it, chances are you’ve never seen what /truly/ sloppy and disoriented sketches very good artists are capable of.

 So if something of yours doesn’t look perfect, and you look at people with all these wonderful sketches on the internet, remember; they very likely have those exact moments of doubt as well.

I needed to hear this recently. :)

ladyloveandjustice:

Height comparisons! CONGRATULATIONS, ED.

*extremely loud and incredibly passionate exclamation of joy*

I have been looking for the Brotherhood height charts for YEARS, and I am so glad I have them now!! 

tyleroakley:

WARM MY HEART

jonnovstheinternet:

nothing says hope quite like flowers growing through the cracks in concrete

ohyeahcomics:

Via Schtaky with thanks to Lickal0lli for the translation

ohyeahcomics:

Via Schtaky with thanks to Lickal0lli for the translation

Me: *goes into OTP tag*
Person: *random hate on OTP in tag*
Me: I came out here to have a good time and I'm honestly feeling so attacked right now

Also, just because it’s worth noting: yes, BGSU, in comparison to other schools, isn’t quite up to par in terms of their animation program. That’s unfortunately what happens when you study under a Gen. Ed school under a blanket major. (to those not from BGSU: at BG, you can’t major exclusively in Animation, like other art schools. You major under Digital Arts and then build your portfolio towards what you want to go into - hence my phrase “blanket major”, because it’s like you throw a blanket over everything encompassing Digital Arts.)

But! While I was scoping out houses in Savannah, I met with a potential housemate who was a graduate student in Animation. I showed her my two short films, “Flight” and “Potoo!”, all while sheepishly stating “Yeah, there are a lot of things I need improvement on…”

Her reply? “You did all this by yourself?” I said, “Yeah, that’s part of the requirement for those classes. You have to learn all aspects of the industry, but you can also get help-” “YOU DID THIS ALL BY YOURSELF?”

She was thoroughly impressed with my work! Especially with the first film I ever completed, “Flight”. And she loved “Potoo!” even more!

So, yes, BGSU’s department isn’t the greatest, but if I was able to impress a graduate student in her final quarter, hey, it can’t be all bad!

(I thought you made some pretty awesome points, so I wanted to share it with everyone. I hope that’s ok!)

First things first: GURL you flatterer, you! <333 Thanks for the encouragement and kind words. I love your style as well and can’t wait to see the new work you’ve come up with! 

I kind of want to apologize for making anyone worry - I’m not feeling down at all! That incident with the Nickelodeon rep is ancient history and I am way over it. It was a sobering learning experience for me and I’m actually glad it happened. Now when I go back I’ll have a kick-ass portfolio to show for it! 

But yeah, you are SO right about taking time off and going back to reflect and revamp styles. That is EXACTLY what you’re supposed to do if you feel your art has become stagnant and under par. (And this goes for EVERYONE!) 

A Nickelodeon recruiter said your work wasn't good enough? : O Tell us that story. That's gotta be scary...I've been thinking a lot about stuff like that too.

the-sphinx-den:

artsycloudypard:

To be fair, I didn’t do a very good job of presenting myself. And in all honesty, I’m not sure I could honestly say that felt my work was good enough. One of the major reasons why I’m going to grad school AND currently leaving my old style behind to play with new ones. ^_^

It was during my most recent trip to the Ottawa International Animation Festival (OIAF). There was a designated portfolio day, and while I had no portfolio to present, I thought perhaps I could have some companies look through my sketchbook and give critique on what worked, what needed improvement, and so on. Again, this wasn’t a very professional way of going about the process, because these were companies looking for portfolios that showed what you could ALREADY do.

The Nickelodeon rep did take a look at my sketch book, though! She was a bit blunt compared to others I had talked with. “Where is your digital work? You need to have worked with digital mediums. I see none of that here. Your style doesn’t fit what we want, either.” She did give me some pointers on how to get better, but I was kind of left reeling after the blunt critique. 

Not gonna lie, it was pretty scary!! But afterwards, I had a similar conversation with a rep from Disney animation - she was a lot kinder than the Nickelodeon rep, but she also gave some important feedback, and also stressed that my current skill level would have to be taken up several knotches to be considered for any animation positions. She also recommended looking into storyboarding, because she saw potential in my sketches for that. :D

So, yeah, it was a scary experience, but you live and learn and grow from it, right?

Totally. That’s still pretty depressing though. Ugh, the future looks so bleak when you sit down and think about it. Part of the reason I’m so salty with BGSU.

It wasn’t depressing at all! In the heat of the moment, it might have been, but it was a good wake-up call for what I would have to do to be considered “good enough”.

BGSU had its shortcomings, sure, but it did do a lot of good for me. :) I wouldn’t have gotten into graduate school without the work I produced there!

A Nickelodeon recruiter said your work wasn't good enough? : O Tell us that story. That's gotta be scary...I've been thinking a lot about stuff like that too.

To be fair, I didn’t do a very good job of presenting myself. And in all honesty, I’m not sure I could honestly say that felt my work was good enough. One of the major reasons why I’m going to grad school AND currently leaving my old style behind to play with new ones. ^_^

It was during my most recent trip to the Ottawa International Animation Festival (OIAF). There was a designated portfolio day, and while I had no portfolio to present, I thought perhaps I could have some companies look through my sketchbook and give critique on what worked, what needed improvement, and so on. Again, this wasn’t a very professional way of going about the process, because these were companies looking for portfolios that showed what you could ALREADY do.

The Nickelodeon rep did take a look at my sketch book, though! She was a bit blunt compared to others I had talked with. “Where is your digital work? You need to have worked with digital mediums. I see none of that here. Your style doesn’t fit what we want, either.” She did give me some pointers on how to get better, but I was kind of left reeling after the blunt critique. 

Not gonna lie, it was pretty scary!! But afterwards, I had a similar conversation with a rep from Disney animation - she was a lot kinder than the Nickelodeon rep, but she also gave some important feedback, and also stressed that my current skill level would have to be taken up several knotches to be considered for any animation positions. She also recommended looking into storyboarding, because she saw potential in my sketches for that. :D

So, yeah, it was a scary experience, but you live and learn and grow from it, right?

My future…

d4h1p573r:

Ok, I am struggling with the fact that my one and only talent falls into a category in the job market that scares me a little. Art/ creative (and other related) jobs seem to be the lowest paying and least reliable. I am only a grade 9 student, and am already worrying about my future and what will become of me. I LOVE art and definitely want to pursue a career in the field, but my mind always is thinking about what collage or university I would go to, what job would I pursue and take up, would I be self sustained or always asking for a loan, would I be in debt? I don’t want to be paying off a school debt for the rest of my life. I REALLY, REALLY, REALLY want to be a 2D hand drawn animator (for disney would be preferred), but the job of 2d animator is becoming slim to none. 3D animation is becoming the norm, but 2D animation is… special. 

2D hand drawn animation has a aurora about it that makes it more personal, more meaningful. Seeing drawings coming alive on screen is special. You feel more of a connection with the film then that of a 3D animation. Glen Keane demonstrates this quite well, as shown here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4JiaLLpmPVc

Glen Keane is probably (in my opinion) one of the best 2d hand drawn animator in the world. He makes Duet seem so personal, even to the everyday viewer. He is my role model for my future, and I aspire to follow in his footsteps. But alas he is a professional with 30 plus years of experience under his belt, while I am a lowly amateur that can only dream to be like him.

I am constantly thinking about how difficult I am going to have to work in order to reach a level in my career where I am actually living comfortably and how I really want to live. But as they say, “Hard work does not necessarily guarantee success, but no success is possible without hard work.”


Hello there, friend! I saw your post in the “Glen Keane” tag, and if it’s alright with you, thought I’d offer my two cents on the matter.

First things first: I think it’s pretty darn awesome how you’re already starting to think about a future career. I didn’t know what career path I wanted to follow until midway through my junior year, almost in my senior year! On the other hand, I would also encourage you not to stress out too much just yet. While it’s important to consider all the “what-ifs”, it’s almost important to enjoy what’s happening presently. You’ve got four years of high school to make the most of and enjoy, so be sure to do that. :) 

If you really want to start looking at potential colleges, though, here’s a list of the top 12 college programs for animation. This fall, I’ll be starting my graduate career at the number 3 slot school, Savannah College of Art and Design, which has a fantastic animation track for traditional and digital forms of animation. 

As an animator major, I’ve been in the same exact position as you’re in - heck, I’d say I still go through it almost once a month. The animation industry is a pretty complex and competitive field, and it can be pretty difficult to get your foot in the door - I’ve yet to get an internship and a Nickelodeon recruiter flat-out told me “your work isn’t good enough”. But it can also be an immensely rewarding field if you bust your buns and work hard towards getting into it. My animation got into a salon des refuses show at the Ottawa International Animation Festival, and yeah, ok, it was literally “the show of rejects”, but, hey! It got in! And people watched it and gave me really great feedback!

When it comes to whether or not 2D animation is a viable source of income, though…it’s tough to say. Yes, a lot of studios are leaning towards 3D animation, but does that render 2D obsolete? Of course not! 2D animation is still in the market for many things, such as commercial animation, animation for television, and so on. Disney Animator Eric Goldberg is now the head of the 2D department at Disney, and they still work on plenty of projects. 2D animators even do a lot of work on 3D animation, such as doing pencil tests to see if certain things can be pulled off in 3D. (He demonstrated this by showing us a GLORIOUS pencil test of King Candy from ‘Wreck It Ralph’ that he completed. :D) And let’s not forget that 2D animation encompasses not just hand-drawn, but stop-motion films as well - Laika Studios (Paranorman, Coraline, The Box Trolls) is even considering doing a hand-drawn feature film, according to sources.

And trust me, you’re not the only one who’s worried about paying off debts and obtaining the means to do so. As my sister so eloquently put it, however: ‘Debt happens”. Having recently just graduated from undergrad and heading off to grad school has pretty much cemented that fact for me as well. XP 

The good news is that there are plenty of resources, both at whatever college you use and through other means (god bless FAFSA, seriously, it’s beyond important) that can help you pay off your debts while you are in college and throughout the years to come. Debts can be scary, but there’s lots of resources out there to make it less so. Applying for scholarships and other awards at colleges is also a good way to defray some costs as well. :D

Ultimately, you should do what makes you the happiest. I think you have the right mindset summed up eloquently at the end of your post, and while it’s definitely important to be healthy and to sustain yourself financially, at the end of the day you should do what YOU love and what makes YOU the happiest. If you’re going into a job just to survive, is that really living? Do what makes you feel the most joy when you wake up in the morning, even if it means you don’t get to live in the fanciest of comforts, even if it means you gotta work a little harder to get there. 

R.I.P. Robin Williams

dontfeeddaelves:

image

I am absolutely heartbroken right now. Robin Williams was such a formative actor growing up, from Aladdin to Awakenings, from Good Will Hunting to Mrs. Doubtfire to Dead Poets Society…

The world has lost one of the greats, and we lost him too soon.